Crab Lane Community Primary School

Skip to main content
15th August 18
Trail : home / STATUTORY INFORMATION / SAFEGUARDING : SAFEGUARDING

CRAB LANE COMMUNITY PRIMARY SCHOOL
SAFEGUARDING POLICY FOR SCHOOLS AND SETTINGS


For Community, voluntary controlled, community special and maintained nursery schools.

To be formally adopted by North Manchester Primary Federation (Crab Lane and Crumpsall Lane Schools) at the Full Governing Body Meeting on 30th March, 2017.

Previously adopted by the Governing Bodies of the Individual Schools.

MANCHESTER CHILDREN’S SERVICES
SAFEGUARDING POLICY FOR SCHOOLS & SETTINGS

Updated January 2017


1.    Introduction
1.1    This policy has been developed to ensure that all adults in North Manchester Primary Federation are working together to safeguard and promote the welfare of children and young people.  This policy has been ratified by the Governing Body at its meeting on 30th March, 2017. See appendix C for a summary of a ‘good’ safeguarding school.

1.2    This policy describes the management systems and arrangements in place to create and maintain a safe learning environment for all our children, young people and staff. It identifies actions that should be taken to redress any concerns about child safety and welfare including protecting pupils and staff from extremist views, vocal or active, which are opposed to fundamental British values. All opinions or behaviours which are contrary to these fundamental values and the ethos of the school will be vigorously challenged.

1.3    This policy describes the management systems and arrangements in place to create and maintain a safe learning environment for all our children, young people and staff. It identifies actions that should be taken to redress any concerns about child welfare.

1.4    The Executive Headteacher (Ms. P. Adams) and Associate Headteacher (Mr. P. Hughes) or, in their absence, the authorised member of senior staff (Mr. M. Jones at Crab Lane or Ms. J. Fairclough at Crumpsall Lane - Head of school), has the ultimate responsibility for safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children and young people.

1.5    Safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children and young people goes beyond implementing basic child protection procedures. It is an integral part of all activities and functions of North Manchester Primary Federation. This policy complements and supports other relevant school and Local Safeguarding Board policies (Appendix A).

1.6    Under the Education Act 2002 schools/settings have a duty to safeguard and promote the welfare of their pupils and, in accordance with guidance set out in ‘Working Together to Safeguard Children 2015’ and ‘Keeping Children Safe in Education 2016,’ North Manchester Primary Federation will work in partnership with other organisations where appropriate to identify any concerns about child welfare and take action to address them.

1.7    Children that are lesbian, bisexual, gay or trans does not constitute a safeguarding risk and the information should be treated as confidential.


2.    Ethos
2.1    North Manchester Primary Federation aims to create and maintain a safe learning environment where all children and adults feel safe, secure and valued and know they will be listened to and taken seriously. Our school is committed to the principles outlined in ‘Working Together to Safeguard Children 2015’ and ‘Keeping Children Safe in Education 2016, and implements policies, practices and procedures which promote safeguarding and the emotional and physical well being of children, young people and staff.

2.2    The school is committed to supporting the delivery of effective early help using The Multi-Agency Levels of Need and Response Framework. The children have access to appropriate curriculum opportunities, including emotional health and well being, to support the development of the skills needed to help them stay safe and healthy, develop their self-esteem and understand the responsibilities of adult life, particularly in regard to child care and parenting skills.

2.3    Access to cross-curricular activities will provide opportunities to develop self-esteem and self-motivation and to help pupils respect the rights of other individuals and potentially vulnerable groups.

2.4    North Manchester Primary Federation will exercise diligence and prevent any organisation or speaker from using the schools facilities to disseminate extremist views or radicalise pupils and staff.


3.    The Curriculum
3.1    All children have access to an appropriate curriculum, differentiated to meet their needs. This enables them to learn to develop the necessary skills to build self-esteem, respect others, defend those in need, resolve conflict without resorting to violence, question and challenge and to make informed choices in later life.

3.2    Children and young people are encouraged to express and discuss their ideas, thoughts and feelings through a variety of activities and have access to a range of cultural opportunities which promote the fundamental British values of tolerance, respect and empathy for others. There is access to a range of extra curricular activities, information and materials from a diversity of sources which not only promotes these values but supports the social, spiritual, moral well-being and physical and mental health of the pupils.

3.3    Personal Health and Social Education, Growing and Changing, Citizenship and Religious Knowledge lessons will provide opportunities for children and young people to discuss and debate a range of subjects including lifestyles, forced marriage, family patterns, religious beliefs and practices and human rights issues.

3.4    North Manchester Primary Federation  takes account of the latest advice and guidance provided to help address specific vulnerabilities and forms of exploitation eg: CSE, Radicalisation and Extremism, Forced Marriage.

3.5    All pupils will know that there are adults in the school whom they can approach in confidence if they are in difficulty or feeling worried and that their concerns will be taken seriously and treated with respect.


4.    Attendance and Exclusions
4.1    North Manchester Primary Federation views attendance as a safeguarding issue and in accordance with the school’s Attendance Policy, absences are rigorously pursued and recorded. The school/setting, in partnership with the appropriate agencies, takes action to pursue and address all unauthorised absences in order to safeguard the welfare of children and young people in its care.

4.2    The Attendance Policy identifies how individual cases are managed and how we work proactively with parents/carers to ensure that they understand why attendance is important. In certain cases this may form part of an Early Help Assessment (EHA) or a Parenting Contract.

4.3    We implement the statutory requirements in terms of monitoring and reporting children missing education (CME) and off-rolling and understand how important this practice is in safeguarding children and young people.

4.4    The school will only place young people in alternative educational provision which is a registered provider and has been quality assured. Young people who require access to alternative provision will have a personalised learning plan designed to meet their needs. Their attendance will be monitored by North Manchester Primary Federation in accordance with the School Register Regulations.

4.5    The designated person will be informed when a fixed term or permanent exclusion is being discussed and any safeguarding issues will be considered. Where it is felt that a child or young person is likely to be permanently excluded a multi-agency assessment will be instigated to ensure that there is improved understanding of the needs of the young person and their family and that the key agencies are involved.


5.    Keeping Records
5.1    North Manchester Primary Federation will keep and maintain up to date information on children on the school roll including where and with whom the child is living, attainment, attendance, referrals to and support from other agencies. The school record will also include a chronology of any other significant event in a child’s life.


6.      Roles and Responsibilities
6.1   The Executive Headteacher and Associate Headteacher of North Manchester Primary Federation will ensure that:
●    The policies and procedures adopted by the Governing Body to safeguard and promote the welfare of pupils are fully implemented and followed by all staff including volunteers.
●    Safe recruitment and selection of staff and volunteers is practiced.
●    A Designated Senior Member of staff for child protection is identified (Ms. P. Adams and Mr. P. Hughes) and receives appropriate on-going training, support and supervision.
●    Sufficient time and resources are made available to enable the designated member of staff to discharge their responsibilities, including attending inter-agency meetings, contributing to the assessment of children and young people, supporting colleagues and delivering training as appropriate.
●    All staff and volunteers receive appropriate training which is regularly updated.
●    All temporary staff and volunteers are made aware of the school’s safeguarding policy and arrangements.
●    All staff and volunteers feel safe about raising concerns about poor or unsafe practice in regard to the safeguarding and welfare of the children and young people and such concerns will be addressed sensitively and effectively.
●    Parents/carers are aware of and have an understanding of the school’s responsibilities to promote the safety and welfare of its pupils by making its obligations clear in the school/setting prospectus.
●    Ensure that the Safeguarding and Child Protection policy is available on the school’s web-site.
●    Ensure that the school co-operates with appropriate agencies and risk based approaches to ensure young people are safeguarded against any potential grooming activities which may attempt to draw them into harmful activities eg CSE and radicalization and extremism.

6.2   The Governing Body of the school will ensure that:
●    A member of the Governing Body is identified  as the designated governor for Safeguarding and receives appropriate training.  The identified governor will provide the governing body with appropriate information about safeguarding and will liaise with the designated member of staff.
●    A senior member of the school’s leadership team is designated to take lead responsibility for safeguarding within the school.
●    The school’s safeguarding policy is regularly reviewed annually and updated and the school complies with local safeguarding procedures.
●    The school operates safe recruitment and selection practices including appropriate use of references and checks on new staff and volunteers.
●    Procedures are in place for dealing with allegations of abuse against members of staff and volunteers and these are in line with Local Authority procedures.
●    All staff and volunteers who have regular contact with children and young people receive appropriate training and information about the school’s safeguarding processes as part of induction.
●    Ensure that the school co-operates with appropriate agencies and risk based approaches to ensure young people are safeguarded against any potential grooming activities which may attempt to draw them into harmful activities eg CSE and radicalization and extremism.

6.3  The Designated Senior Member of Staff for Child Protection has a specific responsibility for championing the importance of safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children and young people registered in the school. The Designated Person will:
●    Act as the first point of contact with regards to all safeguarding matters.
●    Attend up-dated training every two years.
●    Provide relevant information to the LA on how the school carries out its safeguarding duties.
●    Provide support and training for staff and volunteers
●    Ensure that the schools actions are in line with the MCSB Safeguarding Inter-Agency Procedures.  (Guidance on these procedures may be found on MSCB website at manchesterscb.org.uk)
●    Support staff to make effective referrals to the Children and Families Services and any other agencies where there are concerns about the welfare of a child.
●    Keep copies of all referrals to Children and Families Services and any other agencies related to safeguarding children.
●    Ensure that all staff and volunteers receive information on safeguarding policies and procedures from the point of induction.
●    Ensure that any staff with specific responsibility for safeguarding children receive the appropriate training to undertake this role.
●    Manage and keep secure the school’s safeguarding records.
●    Ensure that all staff and volunteers understand and are aware of the school’s reporting and recording procedures and are clear about what to do if they have a concern about a child.
●    Liaise with the Headteacher about any safeguarding issues.
●    Ensure that the Safeguarding Policy is regularly reviewed and up-dated.
●    Keep up to date with changes in local policy and procedures and are aware of any guidance issued by the DfE concerning Safeguarding.
●    Send a pupil’s child protection or safeguarding file separately from the main file to a new establishment if a pupil leaves the school. Keep a copy of the file.
●    Ensure staff are compliant with the EYFS Statutory Guidelines for acceptable use of cameras and mobile phones. (See Appendix D)


7.     Safe Recruitment and Selection of Staff
7.1   The school’s recruitment and selection policies and processes adhere to the DfE guidance “Keeping Children Safe in Education” July 2015.

7.2   The Headteacher and governing body will ensure that all external staff and volunteers using    the school site will have been vetted and checked (will not apply for all schools and settings).


8.    Working With Other Agencies
8.1    North Manchester Primary Federation has developed effective links with other relevant agencies and co-operates as required with any enquiries regarding child protection issues. The school will notify social care if:
●    A child subject to a child protection plan is about to be permanently excluded.
●    There is an unexplained absence of a pupil who is subject to a child protection of more than two days from school.
●    It has been agreed as part of any child protection plan or core group plan.

 

9.    Confidentiality and Information Sharing
9.1    Staff ensure that confidentiality protocols are followed and information is shared appropriately. The Headteacher or Designated Member of Staff discloses any information about a pupil to other members of staff on a need to know basis only.

9.2    All staff and volunteers must understand that they have a professional responsibility to share information with other agencies in order to safeguard children. All staff and volunteers must be clear with children that they cannot promise to keep secrets.

9.3    Disclosing someone’s sexual identity, whether they are staff or pupils, without their consent is a breach of confidentiality. This includes disclosures to a pupil’s parents or carers.


10.    Training For Staff and Volunteers
10.1 In accordance with “Keeping children safe in education - September 2016” all staff will receive training at induction.

10.2    All staff should receive appropriate child protection training which includes basic safeguarding information about the school’s policies and procedures, signs and symptoms of abuse (emotional and physical), indicators of vulnerability to radicalisation, how to manage a disclosure from a child as well as when and how to record a concern about the welfare of a child.

10.3  The Designated Safeguarding Leads (DSLs) will receive refresher training every year. All staff will receive appropriate child protection training which is regularly updated annually.

10.4    All staff will receive training or briefings on particular safeguarding issues, for example, Guns and Gangs, Forced Marriage, Female Genital Mutilation, Domestic Abuse and Child Sexual Exploitation, E-Safety, Preventing Violent Extremism and homophobic, transphobic and bi-phobic bullying.


11.    Recording and Reporting Concerns
Staff members should be aware of the main categories of maltreatment:  physical abuse, emotional abuse, sexual abuse and neglect. They should also be aware of the indicators of maltreatment and specific safeguarding issues so that they are able to identify cases of children who may be in need of help or protection. (See Appendix B for definitions, signs and symptoms of the kinds of abuse and neglect).

11.1    All staff, volunteers and visitors have a responsibility to report any concerns about the welfare and safety of a child and all such concerns must be taken seriously. If a concern arises all staff, volunteers and visitors must:
●    Speak to the Designated Person or the person who acts in their absence
●    Agree with this person what action should be taken, by whom and when it will be reviewed
●    Record the concern using the school’s safeguarding recording system. North Manchester Primary Federation uses an identified single location called CPOMs to log concerns. All members of the Safeguarding Team are alerted that a concern has been raised.
●    All verbal conversations should be promptly recorded on CPOMs.

11.2    Children with special educational needs and disabilities:
 Additional barriers can exist when recognising abuse and neglect in this group of children.  
This can include:
●    Assumptions that indicators of possible abuse such as behaviour, mood and injury relate to the child’s impairment without further exploration;
●    Assumptions that children with SEN and disabilities can be disproportionally impacted by things like bullying- without outwardly showing any signs;
●    Communication barriers and difficulties
●    Reluctance to challenge carers , (professionals may over empathise with carers because of the perceived stress of caring for a disabled child)
●    Disabled children often rely on a wide network of carers to meet their basic needs and therefore  the potential risk of exposure to abusive behaviour can be increased.
●    A disabled child’s understanding of abuse.
●    Lack of choice/participation
●    Isolation

11.3  Peer on peer abuse
Education settings are an important part of the inter-agency framework not only in terms of evaluating and referring concerns to Children’s Services and the Police, but also in the assessment and management  of risk that the child or young person may pose to themselves and others in the education setting.

If one child or young person causes harm to another, this should not necessarily be dealt with as abuse. When considering whether behaviour is abusive, it is important to consider:
●    Whether there is a large difference in power (for example age, size, ability, development) between the young people concerned; or
●    Whether the perpetrator has repeatedly tried to harm one or more other children; or
●    Whether there are concerns about the intention of the alleged perpetrator.

Peer on peer abuse can manifest itself in many ways and different gender issues can be prevalent. Severe harm may be caused to children by abusive and bullying behaviour of other children, which may be physical, sexual or emotional and can include gender based violence/ sexual assaults, sexting, teenage relationship abuse, peer-on-peer exploitation, serious youth violence, sexual bullying or harmful sexual behaviour.


12.    Informing Parents/Carers
a)    Our approach to working with parents/carers is one of transparency and honesty and our responsibility is to safeguard and promote the welfare of all the children in our care.  We aim to do this in partnership with our parents/carers. In most cases parents and carers will be informed when concerns are raised about the safety and welfare of their child.  Parents and carers should be given the opportunity to address any concerns raised.

b)    Parents and carers will be informed if a referral is to be made to the Children’s Social Care Service or any other agency.

c)    Parents/carers will not be informed if it is believed that by doing so would put the child at risk. In such cases the Designated Person, Executive or Associate Headteacher will seek advice from Children’s Social Care.


13.    Domestic Abuse
13.1 The school is aware that children and young people’s development, as well as their social and emotional resilience, is affected by many factors including exposure to domestic abuse or honour based violence (HBV) within the family situation and is a safeguarding issue.

13.2 Children and young people react to domestic abuse in similar ways to other types of abuse and trauma.

13.3. Information about Domestic Abuse and its effect upon children and young people will be incorporated into staff Safeguarding and Child Protection training and briefings and the school’s Safeguarding and Child Protection’s Policies and Procedures will be used to protect children and young people exposed to, and at risk from, domestic abuse.

13.4 Any child or young person thought to be at immediate risk will be reported without delay to   the police service as a 999 emergency and the Manchester Children’s Service Contact Centre will be contacted as soon as possible.


14.    Forced Marriage
14.1    Forced Marriage became a criminal offence in June 2014.  It is a form of child, adult and domestic abuse and, in line with statutory guidance, is treated as such by this school. The school is sensitive to differing family patterns and lifestyles and child-rearing patterns that vary across different racial, ethnic and cultural groups. Child abuse cannot be condoned for religious or cultural reasons.

14.2    Information about Forced Marriage will be incorporated into staff Safeguarding and Child Protection training and briefings and the school’s Safeguarding and Child Protection Policies will be used to protect a victim or potential victim of forced marriage.

14.3    If a case of forced marriage is suspected, parents and carers will not be approached or involved about a referral to any other agencies.


15.    Female Genital Mutilation
15.1 Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) is illegal in the United Kingdom and is a violation of human rights of girls and women. Information on FGM will be incorporated into staff Safeguarding and Child Protection training and briefings.

15.2 The Serious Crime Act 2015 strengthened further the legislation on FGM and now includes a new statutory duty placed on professionals (including teachers) to notify the police when they discover that FGM appears to have been carried out on a girl under 18.

 

16.   Preventing Radicalisation and Violent Extremism
16.1 North Manchester Primary Federation values the fundamental rights of freedom of speech, expression of beliefs and ideology and tolerance of others which are the core values of our democratic society. However, all rights come with responsibilities and free speech or beliefs designed to manipulate the vulnerable or which advocate harm or hatred towards others will not be tolerated. North Manchester Primary Federation seeks to protect its students and staff from all messages and forms of violent extremism and ideologies including those linked to, but not restricted, to the following: Far Right/Neo Nazi, White Supremacist ideology, Islamist ideology, Irish Nationalist and Loyalist paramilitary groups and extremist Animal Rights groups.

16.2 North Manchester Primary Federation is clear that exploitation and radicalisation will be viewed as a safeguarding concern and will be referred to the appropriate safeguarding agencies.


17. e.Safety
17.1 North Manchester Primary Federation has an E-Safety Policy which recognises that E-safety is a safeguarding issue not an ICT issue. The purpose of internet use in school is to help raise educational standards, promote pupil achievement, and support the professional work of staff as well as enhance the school’s management information and business administration.

17.2 The internet is an essential element in 21st century life for education, business and social interaction and North Manchester Primary Federation has a duty to provide children and young people with quality access as part of their learning experience.

17.3 It is the duty of North Manchester Primary Federation to ensure that every child and young person is in its care is safe and this applies equally to the ‘virtual’ or digital world.

17.4 North Manchester Primary Federation recognises that the production and distribution of sexting images involving anyone under the age of 18 is illegal and needs very careful management for all those involved. This will be reported to the DSL and the device confiscated. If relevant, report to Children’s Services and the police. If further advice is needed, contact Professional Online Safety Helpline. (0844 381 4772)

17.5. North Manchester Primary Federation will ensure that appropriate filtering methods are in place to ensure that pupils are safe from all types of inappropriate and unacceptable materials, including terrorist and extremist material.


18.    Child Protection Conferences and Core Group Meetings
18.1    Members of staff are likely to be asked to attend a child protection conference or other relevant core group meetings about an individual pupil and will need to have as much relevant updated information about the child as possible. A child protection conference will be held if it is considered that the child/children are suffering or at risk of significant harm.

18.2    All reports for a child protection conference should be prepared in advance of the meeting and will include information about the child’s physical, emotional, intellectual development and well being as well as relevant family related issues.  This information will be shared with the parents/carers.


19.   Managing Allegations and Concerns Against Staff and Volunteers
 19.1 The school follows the government guidance Keeping Children Safe in Education – July 2015 when dealing with allegations made against staff and volunteers.

19.2 All allegations made against a member of staff and volunteers, including contractors or security staff working on site, will be dealt with quickly and fairly and in a way that provides effective protection for the child while at the same time providing support for the person against whom the allegation is made.


20.    Complaints or Concerns by Pupils, Staff or Volunteers
20.1 Any concern or expression of disquiet made by a child will be listened to seriously and acted upon as quickly as possible to safeguard his or her welfare.

20.2 We will make sure that the child or adult who has expressed the concern or made the   complaint will be informed not only about the action to be taken but also where possible about the length of time required to resolve the complaint.  We will endeavour to keep the child or adult informed about the progress of the complaint/expression of concern.


21.   Serious Case Reviews
21.1  The Manchester Safeguarding Children Board will always undertake a serious case review when a child or young person dies (including death by suicide) and abuse or neglect is known or suspected to be a factor in their death.  The purpose of the serious case review is to:
●    Find out if there are any lessons to be learnt from the case about how local professionals and agencies work together to safeguard and promote the welfare of children and young people
●    Identify what those lessons are, how they will be acted on and what is expected to change as a result of the serious case review.
●    Improve inter-agency working to better safeguard and promote the welfare of children and young people

21.2 If required North Manchester Primary Federation will provide an individual management report for a serious case review and will cooperate fully with implementing outcomes of the review including reviewing policy, practice and procedures as required.


22.   Visitors
22.1 All visitors, including visiting speakers, are subject to the school’s safeguarding protocols while on site and will be supervised at all times.


23.   Bookings
23.1 North Manchester Primary Federation operates a responsible booking protocol and will carry out appropriate checks and will exercise due diligence to prevent an organisation or speaker from using the school’s facilities to disseminate extremist views or radicalise pupils or staff.

Further Information on Safeguarding and Safeguarding Policies can be found on
the MSCB Website at www.manchesterscb.org.uk

APPENDIX A
School Policies:
●    Health and Safety
●    Physical Interventions/Restraint (Team Teach framework)
●    Sex and Relationships Education (Growing and Changing Policy)
●    Equal Opportunities
●    E-Safety
●    Behaviour Management including fixed and short term exclusions
●    Educational Trips and Visits
●    Special Educational Needs
●    Intimate Care Policy
●    Accessibility Plan
●    Anti-bullying
●    Administration of Medicines

For further information, guidance and policies visit MSCB website @ www.mscb.org.uk):
  ●    Managing Allegations and Concerns Against Staff and Volunteers
●    Forced Marriage
●    Domestic Abuse
●    Missing from Home and Care
●    Private Fostering
●    Child Sexual Exploitation
●    Guns and Gangs
●    E-Safety Policy
●    Safe Staffing and Recruitment


APPENDIX B
The following definitions are from Working Together to Safeguard Children (2015) and Keeping Children Safe in Education - September 2016.


Significant Harm
The threshold that justifies compulsory intervention in family life and gives Local Authorities a duty to make enquiries to decide whether they should take action to safeguard or promote the welfare of a child who is suffering or likely to suffer significant harm.


Physical Abuse
Physical abuse may involve hitting, shaking, throwing, poisoning, burning or scalding, drowning, suffocating or otherwise causing physical harm to a child. Physical harm may also be caused when a parent or carer fabricates the symptoms of, or deliberately induces an illness in a child.

Physical abuse
Physical abuse may involve hitting, shaking, throwing, poisoning, burning or scalding, drowning, suffocating or otherwise causing physical harm to a child.

Child
●    Bruises – shape, grouping, site, repeat or multiple
●    Withdrawal from physical contact
●    Bite-marks – site and size
●    Burns and Scalds – shape, definition, size, depth, scars
●    Aggression towards others, emotional and behaviour problems
●    Improbable, conflicting explanations for injuries or unexplained injuries
●    Frequently absent from school
●    Untreated injuries
●    Admission of punishment which appears excessive
●    Injuries on parts of body where accidental injury is unlikely
●    Fractures
●    Repeated or multiple injuries
●    Fabricated or induced illness.

Parent
●    Family/environment
●    Parent with injuries
●    History of mental health, alcohol or drug misuse or domestic violence
●    Evasive or aggressive towards child or others
●    Past history in the family of childhood abuse, self-harm, somatising disorder or false allegations of physical or sexual assault
●    Explanation inconsistent with injury
●    Marginalised or isolated by the community
●    Fear of medical help / parents not seeking medical help
●    Physical or sexual assault or a culture of physical chastisement
●    Over chastisement of child.

Emotional Abuse
Emotional abuse is the persistent emotional maltreatment of a child such as to cause severe and persistent adverse effects on the child’s emotional development. It may involve conveying to children that they are worthless or unloved, inadequate, or valued only insofar as they meet the needs of another person. It may feature age or developmentally inappropriate expectations being imposed on children.  These may include interactions that are beyond the child’s developmental capability, as well as overprotection and limitation of exploration and learning, or preventing the child participating in normal social interaction.  It may involve seeing or hearing the ill-treatment of another.  It may involve serious bullying, causing children frequently to feel frightened or in danger, or the exploitation or corruption of children.  Some level of emotional abuse is involved in all types of maltreatment of a child, though it may occur alone.

Emotional abuse
Emotional abuse is the persistent emotional maltreatment of a child such as to cause severe and persistent adverse effects on the child’s emotional development.  It may involve conveying to children that they are worthless or unloved, not giving the child opportunities to express their views,  ‘making fun’ of what they say or how they communicate - hearing the ill-treatment of another and serious bullying (including cyber bullying).


Child
●    Self-harm
●    Over-reaction to mistakes / Inappropriate emotional responses
●    Chronic running away
●    Abnormal or indiscriminate attachment
●    Drug/solvent abuse
●    Low self-esteem
●    Compulsive stealing
●    Extremes of passivity or aggression
●    Makes a disclosure
●    Social isolation – withdrawn, a ‘loner’ Frozen watchfulness particularly pre school  
●    Developmental delay
●    Depression
●    Neurotic behaviour (e.g. rocking, hair twisting, thumb sucking)
●    Desperate attention-seeking behaviour.

Parent
●    Family/environment
●    Observed to be aggressive towards child or others
●    Marginalised or isolated by the community.
●    Intensely involved with their children, never allowing anyone else to undertake their child's care.
●    History of mental health, alcohol or drug misuse or domestic violence.
●    Previous domestic violence
●    History of unexplained death, illness or multiple surgery in parents and/or siblings of the family
●    History of abuse or mental health problems
●    Past history in the care of childhood abuse, self harm, somatising disorder or false allegations of physical or sexual assault
●    Mental health, drug or alcohol difficulties
●    Wider parenting difficulties
●    Cold and unresponsive to the child’s emotional needs
●    Physical or sexual assault or a culture of physical chastisement
●    Overly critical of the child
●    Lack of support from family or social network.


Sexual Abuse
Sexual abuse involves forcing or enticing a child or young person to take part in sexual activities, including prostitution, whether or not the child is aware of what is happening.
The activities may involve physical contact, including penetrative (e.g. rape, buggery or oral sex) or non-penetrative acts. The activities may include non-contact activities, such as involving children in looking at, or in the production of, sexual online images, watching sexual activities, or encouraging children to behave in sexually inappropriate ways.

Sexual abuse
Sexual abuse involves forcing or enticing a child or young person to take part in sexual activities, not necessarily involving a high level of violence, whether or not the child is aware of what is happening. The activities may involve physical contact or non-contact activities, such as involving children in looking at sexual images or being groomed on line / child exploitation.


Child
Self-harm - eating disorders, self-mutilation and suicide attempts
Poor self-image, self-harm, self-hatred
Running away from home
Inappropriate sexualised conduct
Reluctant to undress for PE
Withdrawal, isolation or excessive worrying
Pregnancy
Sexual knowledge or behaviour inappropriate to age/stage of development, or that is unusually explicit
Inexplicable changes in behaviour, such as becoming aggressive or withdrawn
Poor attention / concentration (world of their own)
Pain, bleeding, bruising  or itching in genital and /or anal area
Sudden changes in school work habits, become truant
Sexually exploited or indiscriminate choice of sexual partners

Parent
Family/environment
History of sexual abuse
Marginalised or isolated by the community.
Excessively interested in the child
History of mental health, alcohol or drug misuse or domestic violence.
Parent displays inappropriate behaviour towards the child or other children
History of unexplained death, illness or multiple surgery in parents and/or siblings of the family
Conviction for sexual offences
Past history in the care of childhood abuse, self harm, somatising disorder or false allegations of physical or sexual assault
Comments made by the parent/carer about the child.
Grooming behaviour
Lack of sexual boundaries
Physical or sexual assault or a culture of physical chastisement.


Neglect
Neglect is the persistent failure to meet a child’s basic physical and/or psychological needs, likely to result in the serious impairment of the child’s health or development.
Neglect may occur during pregnancy as a result of maternal substance abuse for example.
Once a child is born, neglect may involve a parent or carer failing to:
•    Provide adequate food and clothing, shelter (including exclusion from home or abandonment).
•    Protect a child from physical and emotional harm or danger.
•    Ensure adequate supervision (including the use of inadequate caretakers).
•    Ensure access to appropriate medical care or treatment.
•    It may also include neglect of, or unresponsiveness to, a child’s basic emotional needs.

Neglect
Neglect is the persistent failure to meet a child’s basic physical and/or psychological needs, likely to result in the serious impairment of the child’s health or development.


Child
●    Failure to thrive - underweight, small stature
●    Low self-esteem
●    Dirty and unkempt condition
●    Inadequate social skills and poor socialisation
●    Inadequately clothed
●    Frequent lateness or non-attendance at school
●    Dry sparse hair
●    Abnormal voracious appetite at school or nursery
●    Untreated medical problems
●    Self-harming behaviour
●    Red/purple mottled skin, particularly on the hands and feet, seen in the winter due to cold
●    Constant tiredness
●    Swollen limbs with sores that are slow to heal, usually associated with cold injury
●    Disturbed peer relationships

Parent
●    Family/environment
●    Failure to meet the child’s basic essential needs including health needs
●    Marginalised or isolated by the community.
●    Leaving a child alone
●    History of mental health, alcohol or drug misuse or domestic violence.
●    Failure to provide adequate caretakers
●    History of unexplained death, illness or multiple surgery in parents and/or siblings of the family
●    Keeping an unhygienic dangerous or hazardous home environment

Past history in the family of childhood abuse, self harm, somatising disorder or false allegations of physical or sexual assault
Unkempt presentation
Lack of opportunities for child to play and learn
Unable to meet child’s emotional needs
Dangerous or hazardous home environment including failure to use home safety equipment; risk from animals
Mental health, alcohol or drug difficulties


APPENDIX C
A ‘Good’ Safeguarding School
The leadership, staff and governing body are committed to a safe school which promotes the well-being and welfare of all its pupils, staff and visitors and the following is embedded into its vision, culture and practices:

Ethos and Environment
●    The school is a place where ‘Every Child Matters’.
●    The environment is welcoming and pleasant and pupils, staff and visitors are greeted appropriately.
●    The school/setting has pleasant and welcoming dining areas and encourages healthy eating.
●    Achievements and progress are regularly celebrated and pupils have high expectations of themselves and others and understand that long-term goals are worth working for.
●    Pupils feel valued and are open and confident in their relationships with staff and one another.
●    Pupil’s work is displayed and changed regularly.

Practices and Procedures
●    The school has a ‘Safeguarding Policy’ which all staff understand and practices are fully implemented.
●    Behaviour Management and Anti-bullying Policies are in place and are clearly understood and followed by all.
●    The Multi Agency Levels of Need and Response Framework is embedded.
●    Effective School Improvement Plan and effective school self-evaluation procedures are in place.
●    Appropriate Policies and Procedures are in place, understood and implemented by all staff.
●    The school/setting takes account of the DDA and has made appropriate adjustments for staff and pupils.
●    All staff involved in safeguarding liaise regularly to ensure continuity in the support they provide.
●    The school/setting has an identified person who administers medicines.
●    DBS checks are in place and regularly up-dated.
●    Appropriate Risk Assessment procedures are in place and up-dated.

Pupil Tracking
●    The progress and attendance of pupils in alternative provision is carefully tracked and monitored as for other pupils.
●    Pupil tracking systems are in place and used effectively to monitor and track progress and intervene as required.
●    Vulnerable groups are identified and tracked for progress, attainments and attendance.
●    Effective transition for pupils takes place at all stages.

Staff Training
●    The Leadership and Management of the school is trained in Safeguarding and is effective.
●    A Senior Designated Person for Safeguarding is nominated and receives regular training and has access to appropriate supervision.
●    Staff receive regular up-dated training on Safeguarding and identified staff receive higher level training as appropriate.

Pupil Engagement
●    Pupil voice is valued and the School Council is afforded respect and is involved appropriately in decision making.
●    Pupils are given responsibility in supporting other pupils and are involved in routine organisational tasks and activities.
●    Pupils are encouraged to participate in a variety of clubs and activities.

The Curriculum
●    The curriculum, organisation of teaching and learning and ethos in settings and schools contributes to teaching children and young people about safety issues, including road safety, accident prevention, substance misuse, sexual harassment, self-harm, Internet safety and building resilience.
●    Staff expectations of pupil’s behaviour, attendance and attainment are high.
●    School has developed approaches to tackling all forms of bullying including, racist, homophobic and cyber-bullying.  This includes tackling issues leading to grooming and child sexual exploitation and radicalisation
●    There are formal and informal opportunities to praise reward and celebrate pupils behaviour and achievements in lessons, tutor groups, assemblies, dinner time, break time, before and after school, trips etc.

Working with Parents and Outside Agencies
●    There is effective communication between the school staff, outside agencies and parents/carers.
●    Family intervention work is an integral part of the school’s support for children and families.
●    The school actively pursues all absence – they know which children are at risk of becoming/or are persistently absent – non-attendance is understood as a potential safeguarding issue.
●    The school does not exclude pupils but tries to find alternative ways of supporting them.
●    The school does not see pupils at risk of gang involvement, sexual exploitation, radicalisation or criminal activity as crime and disorder issues but as a ‘children in need issue’ and works closely with other partner agencies to safeguard them.

Indicators of Vulnerability to Radicalisation
●    Pupil is distanced from their cultural/religious heritage and experience.
●    Pupil demonstrates discomfort about their place in society.
●    Pupil may be experiencing family tensions at home.
●    Low self esteem and sense of isolation.
●    Pupil has distanced self from existing friendship groups and become involved with a different group of friends.
●    Pupil may be searching for questions about their identity, faith and belonging.
●    Pupil may have perceptions of injustice and rejects civic life.
●    Pupil is accessing extremist websites and is in contact with extremist recruiters.
●    Pupil justifies violence to solve societal issues.
●    Significant changes in behaviour and/or appearance.
●    Pupil uses extremist narratives and global ideology to explain personal disadvantage.


APPENDIX D
The use of Mobile phones and cameras across EYFS
To ensure the safety and welfare of the children in our care we have outlined the protocols for the use of personal mobile phones and cameras in the setting.
  ●    Personal mobile phones, cameras and video recorders cannot be used when in the presence of children either on school premises or when on outings.
  ●    All mobile phones must be stored securely within the setting during contact time with children. (This includes staff, visitors, parents, volunteers and students).
  ●    No parent is permitted to use their mobile phone or use its camera facility whilst inside school buildings. School policy regarding this matter should be explained clearly to parents by the EYFS manager.
  ●    Mobile phones must not be used in any teaching area within the setting or within the bathroom area.
  ●    In the case of a personal emergency staff should use the school telephone. It is the responsibility of all staff to make families aware of the school telephone numbers.
  ●    Personal calls may be made in non-contact time but not within the teaching areas.
  ●    Personal mobiles, cameras or video recorders should not be used to record classroom activities. ONLY school equipment should be used.
  ●    Photographs and recordings can only be transferred to and stored on a school computer before printing.
  ●    All telephone contact with Parents/Carers must be made on the school telephone.
  ●    During group outings nominated staff will have access to the school mobile which can be used in an emergency or for contact purposes.
  ●    In the case of school productions, Parents/carers are permitted to take photographs of their own child in accordance with school protocols which strongly advise against the publication of any such photographs on Social networking sites.